A review of han gong ju a movie by su jin lee

Alas, Han Gong-ju is never a film about hope. Seventeen-year-old Gong-ju Chun Woo-hee is transferred mid-semester from her school to another one in Incheon.

Furthermore, the fifty-something woman wants to ensure that nothing interferes with her new romantic relationship with a local police chief. Although Gong Ju is not interested she asks Eun Hee for her phone to help with directions so she can find her mother.

Eun-hee is too chirpy, Mrs. The pity is that Lee has a sure way with actors, and the pic is full of fine performances — not just by Chun, trying hard to reveal a complex figure beneath the trauma, but notably Lee Young-lan as Mrs.

On-disc extras include Enemy's Apple - a 20 minute short film by director Lee Su-jin, and trailers. Seventeen-year-old Gong-ju Chun Woo-hee is transferred mid-semester from her school to another one in Incheon.

Han Gong-ju

The film manoeuvres around its central secret, but is never coy. Lee comes to a grudging admiration for this obviously damaged girl and is close to being her only real supporter though perhaps only up to a point.

Perhaps next time Lee Su-jin should stick to directing, and let others write his scripts. The scene shifts to her teacher from her current school, Lee Nan do Jo Dae Heehelping her pack her luggage as she is about to be transferred to another school in a different town.

It is not long after that Hwa Ok commits suicide by jumping off a bridge and drowning. Under the effects of the drug she is gang raped as well. Cho, for possible board in her house. It is not long after that Hwa Ok commits suicide by jumping off a bridge and drowning.

However, at its best, cinema goes beyond mere distraction and has the ability to move us deeply. Major some will say misguided awards at Marrakech and Rotterdam will likely extend its fest life.

Produced by Lee Su-jin. The poor kid is never seen without major bruises on his face are his parents blind. The poor kid is never seen without major bruises on his face are his parents blind.

Major some will say misguided awards at Marrakech and Rotterdam will likely extend its fest life. He then brings Gong Ju to the convenient store owned by his mother, Mrs. One hour into this film, its emotional centre remains elusive, but as hints and information fragments accumulate, each sliver of truth proves to be more devastating than its predecessor.

He then brings Gong Ju to the convenient store owned by his mother, Mrs. In the present time, Gong Ju tries to pick up swimming by attending lessons and meets Eun Hee who tries to befriend her after hearing her sing in the changing room.

Han Gong-Ju is a character that at the start of the film is an introvert, but as the film progresses she comes out of her shell, almost finding that level of normality that she fully deserves.

‘Han Gong-Ju’ Review – Intense, Harrowing and Brilliant

Bearing that in mind, it is safe to say that it deals with a serious problem in Korean society that has recently been getting more and more exposure through local media and particularly cinema.

Gong Ju runs away and hides in an empty room. A background voice is heard asking Gong Ju why she wants to swim so badly. Chun Woo-hee is superb in the title role. Part of the problem lies in the incessant, frustrating alternations between present and past a script decision rather than an editing oneeach transition providing only a modicum of information before the film jumps back again.

Produced by Lee Su-jin. Korean cinema continues from strength to strength. We only see a disturbing ending that manages to accept instead of escape from incontrovertible truths, leaving nothing but a struggle that is simply bound to end on its own.

As Gong-ju, Chun catches every nuance of panic and pain that a teenage girl stripped of all standard forms of emotional and psychological support would experience. Shortly after, cluster of angry parents barge in and interrupt the classroom to harass Gong Ju for having put their sons in jail.

Slowly, she begins to open up to the girls and shares with them that her absolute goal is to learn to swim at least 25 metres. Perhaps next time Lee Su-jin should stick to directing, and let others write his scripts. The pity is that Lee has a sure way with actors, and the pic is full of fine performances — not just by Chun, trying hard to reveal a complex figure beneath the trauma, but notably Lee Young-lan as Mrs.

More or less shut down, Gong-ju is wary of making new acquaintances among her peers. Following a possibly well-meaning or maybe a little less so action by her new group of friends, the true reasons for her being forced into hiding are thrown into the light and Gong-ju once again becomes the centre of a storm composed of a complex system of societal repercussions.

At her new school she keeps herself to herself, making sure to remain distant from her fellow pupils.

Han Gong-Ju

Lee Su-jin has worked up to this point masterfully manipulating our connection to the main character and forcing us to become part of the experience, no matter how much it hurts.

STORY: Marrakech Fest: South Korea's 'Han Gong-Ju' Takes Top Prize. While Lee carefully postpones the revelation of the nature of his protagonist's ordeal, the truth couldn't be more thinly-veiled. Lee Young-ran is the second-biggest constant in the film as reluctant mother-figure Mrs.

Cho, and while the character isn't quite Gong-ju plus thirty-odd years of people living down to expectations, the actress certainly captures how a woman's bad reputation can be an embittering thing.

Despite the defeatist premise, Lee Su-jin’s visually dissonant directorial debut maintains a constant tug-of-war between the tragedy permanently marked upon Han Gong-Ju, and an optimistic rebuilding of her life in a new town. Su-jin Lee, Su-jin Lee.

'Han Gong-ju' grabs 3 awards

In Theaters: Oct 4, limited. Runtime: minutes "Han Gong-ju" is beautiful, brave and ambitious but ultimately too 80%.

Rotterdam Film Review: ‘Han Gong-ju’

Summary: After a scandalous incident, Han Gong-Ju is forced to change schools. Uncared for by her parents, her former teacher takes her to his mother's place.

As an investigation continues back in Han Gong-Ju's hometown, she tries to acclimate to her new surroundings.

Han Gong-Ju

There is no doubt that filmmaker Lee Su-jin’s feature debut “Han Gong-ju” is a rare cinematic achievement. It is visually and textually strong, musically appealing, and deals with its difficult subject matter ― a story about a teenage gang rape victim ― with sensitivity and nuance.

A review of han gong ju a movie by su jin lee
Rated 3/5 based on 17 review
MOVIE REVIEW: Han Gong-ju ()